Skip to content

The Guardian: Small British paper makes big impact with NSA stories

July 2, 2013

By Paul Farhi

For a newspaper that’s small and underweight even by British standards, the Guardian has a knack for making some big noises, both in its home market and across the pond.

The venerable paper (founded in 1821) was one of five news organizations to publish stories based on WikiLeaks’s trove of leaked U.S. diplomatic cables in late 2010. The only American newspaper to publish the leaks, the New York Times, did so thanks to the generosity of the Guardian, which shared the documents.

Next, the Guardian’s revelations about the extent of illegal phone tapping by journalists at Rupert Murdoch’s News of the World in 2011 helped bring down the massively popular British tabloid and led to a wave of criminal prosecutions in Britain.

In late May, the Guardian was at it once more. The newspaper raced The Washington Post to break details of a massive National Security Agency surveillance program. It subsequently posted the first and only video interview with Edward Snowden, the young American security contractor who was the source of The Post’s and Guardian’s stories.

Not a bad run of scoops for a financially struggling, frankly liberal newspaper with a newsprint circulation of fewer than 160,000 copies daily (which makes it roughly the size of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette) but with a significantly larger digital following worldwide. Read the rest in the Washington Post.

Related stories:

Five truths about Glenn Greenwald and his critics

Advertisements

From → Commentary

One Comment
  1. My partner and I stumbled over here coming from
    a different website and thought I might as well check things out.
    I like what I see so now i’m following you. Look forward to going over your web page yet again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s